Building Materials

Building material is any material which is used for construction purposes.

Thermoanalytical and thermophysical property methods allow for comprehensive characterization of building materials. Knowledge about such aspects as composition, mass loss, binder burnout, thermal expansion, sintering, softening point and thermal conductivity is critical in the development of new materials and helps to ensure that final products can meet the demands being placed upon them.


Recommended literature:

Recommended literature:

Detailed Insight Into the World of Thermal Analysis

Detailed Insight Into the World of Thermal Analysis

Simultaneous Thermal Analysis (STA) is ideal for investigating issues such as the glass transition of modified glass, binder burnout and decomposition behavior - also with instrumentation for Evolved Gas Analysis (EGA) coupled to the thermal analyzer.

The expansion and shrinkage behavior of building materials, both during sintering and once in use, can be measured with Dilatometry.

LFA, HFM and TCT are versatile methods for precise determination of the thermal conductivity on samples both small and large.

Some Application Examples

Some Application Examples

Measurement of Phase Transitions of Glass Wool

Glass Wool is often used for the insulation of houses and heating pipes. The STA measurement shows three mass-loss steps below approx. 600°C, which are due to the evaporation of humidity and the burn-up of organic binder. The latter can be seen from the strongly exothermic DSC signal in this temperature range. The step in the DSC signal at 728°C with an increase in the specific heat of 0.41 J/(g*K) is due to the glass transition. The exothermic DSC peak at 950°C with an enthalpy of -287 J/g is due to crystallization; the endothermic effects between approx. 1050°C and 1250°C with an entire enthalpy of 549 J/g show the melting. The slight mass changes above 700°C are most probably due to oxidation and evaporation of impurities.

Thermal Expansion of Fired Tiles

Two colored tiles were simultaneously heated at 3K/min to 1100°C. The curves for the relative expansion of these fired tiles show significant differences in expansivity and quartz content (>567°C). The Proteus® software allows a graphic display of the expansion difference in a separate curve.

Thermal Decomposition of Dolomite

The mass loss steps during the thermal decomposition of dolomite [CaMg(CO3)2] overlap when the measurement is performed in a nitrogen atmosphere. By using CO2 as a purge gas, they can be clearly separated. The calculated DTA signal (c-DTA®) additionally yields the information that both effects are endothermal.